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The Northerner

What McDonalds can teach you

Dan Robards and Dan Robards

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One thing that makes NKU unique is that most of the students work to pay for some of their college experience. According to NKU President James Votruba, 85 percent of NKU students work at least 20 hours a week. Some work at a part-time job as a way to get through school, and others work full-time at jobs that give them experience and a step forward in their careers.’

Even if it’s not your dream job, having work experience is valuable experience to have. If you approach it with an open mind, you will learn something different and new from each experience. Either way, you should approach work as if you were approaching your ultimate career choice, as it will help you prepare for your anticipated future.

Many times college students find themselves at the same job for years with no promotions and minimal raises. Even though most of us are young and feel largely unproven, with the right company we have a good to chance to advance because most are looking for bright young talent to invest in; talent that will be around for years to come. So how do we start to climb the ladder?

First things first: find a job that has opportunities for advancement. Small companies offer a unique business setting that allows you take on more responsibility, but also limit the bar to a promotion.

However, if you are able to display a strong work ethic for either an empty wallet or just some spare change in your pocket, your bosses will recognize the fact that you are capable of something far greater.’ ‘

Once you find a job that serves as your foundation to success, it is time to start getting ahead. If your looking to get promoted, you should let your bosses know that you are looking for more opportunity.’

Even if you do not stay at that job the rest of your life, promotions show up well on your resume. When future employers see that you’re promoted, they will automatically assume three things: you’re hardworking, dependable and capable of continuously learning new things.

Sometimes it’s not about what you know, but who you know. If you are good at networking, you can probably succeed further in life. It’s not mandatory, but it definitely wouldn’t hurt you to get to know key decision-makers where your work.

Even if they are not directly supervising, you should treat everyone above you with kindness and respect because chances are, they’re probably within the sphere of influence of the people who are filling out your progress reports or dishing out raises.
The more memorable you are, the better. So if there’s a company picnic where you will have the opportunity to talk to your bosses and get to know them, take it. I know sucking up is beneath you, and you shouldn’t have to be a kiss-ass to move ahead, but the fact of life is that networking helps. The more you network the better the possibility of someone recognizing your hard work is readily available.

People at work like to be around someone that is easy to work with. Even though you aren’t there to make friends, it doesn’t mean you can’t be friendly.

Businesses find morale to be important to productivity and overall happiness of its workers.’ No one wants a distraction; no matter how good the talent. It takes away from the whole team motivation. A perfect example would be Terrell Owens (TO). He was a phenomenal football player in his prime, and he has an impressive array of career stats and accomplishments, but throughout his 14-year career he has been a cancer to the locker room wherever he has gone.’

Known for publicly insulting quarterbacks and screaming at offensive coordinators on the sidelines team after the team has decided to move on because TO put himself before the team and was a distraction in the locker room. The same can be said for companies, they look for character.

Rule number one to remember is that business is about people first. Whether it is knowing how to win over clients to make sales or working with coworkers, if you want to be successful you have to be good with people.

The trick to being easy to work with is being humble, There is a fine line between confidence and arrogance. If you’re good at what you do there is no problem in saying that, but you do not need to constantly remind us of it.

For example, if you lead the office in sales or become employee of the month, do not parade around the office telling everyone how great it feels. Take your accomplishments in stride like a professional and act like you have been there before.

People tend to despise people with big egos because they tend to think of their own needs instead of others’. If you are trying to get a position of leadership, people have to think you have their best interests at heart – why would they work for someone who is going to steal all the glory?

Just go the extra mile. Even though it is not in your job description and you are not getting paid to help the world’s worst employee finish up his paperwork, people will notice that you’re willing to do what it takes to get the job done. On top of that you make your boss look good. This might seem counterproductive to the untrained eye, but your worst nightmare is a mediocre boss. If you’re going to get promoted, you need an opening, and the only way you are getting promoted is if your boss screws up big time and gets fired, or if your boss gets promoted. So if you’re looking to get promoted, what is good for your boss is good for you.

It is OK to be invaluable, but do not be irreplaceable. If you have a good position with the company they will not promote you unless they can find someone to fill your shoes. So if you are trying to get promoted, make it your responsibility to make sure there is at least one person beneath you who can do what you do should your big day come.

All this being said, you still have to be able to perform at your job. Most companies (emphasis on most) do not reward people who cannot do their jobs, much less give them more responsibility, but just doing your job is not always good enough. The people who get promotions at work are the ones who do their job and then some.

Most people can do their jobs, but it is the ‘and then some’ department where they are lacking.


http://president.nku.edu/

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The Independent Student Newspaper of Northern Kentucky University.
What McDonalds can teach you