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The Northerner

Religious group speaks out against masturbation, gays, premartial sex

Jennifer Corbett

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For pictures of the demonstration, check out the Nov. 15 issue of The Northerner.

Masturbation. Homosexuality. Impure thoughts. Oh my!

That was the basic theme of a religious organization that started a controversial protest on Northern Kentucky University’s campus Nov. 7.

Faithful Soldier, a group from the School of Evangelism in Milwaukee, Wis., held signs with “respect your purity,” “flee sexual morality” and “in the beginning God made them make a male and female and a man should be joined into his wife and the two shall become one.”

“The overall message of the debate was share the truth from the bible,” said Candace Knapschaefer, a student in the School of Evangelism.

According to Harold Todd, chief of University Police, no one was arrested during the event. He added that officers might have told people to calm down, though no actions were taken.

Other points the speakers made was to say that homosexuality, premarital sex and impure thoughts are against god’s will.

In retaliation, several students starting holding hands and yelling, “I love dudes!”

Students held signs that said, “I have sex,” “I do too” and “I masturbate” in response to what the School of Evangelism preached.

This in turn upset a lot of students saying one of the speakers, Ben Blowdawn, was being vindictive.

“I don’t feel like they’re here to do good,” said Elise Thompson, a sophomore fine arts major. “Did they really think they would come here and bring people together?”

However, one of the speakers saw the speech it in a different way.

“The message is to call people for repentance and turn from their sins to Jesus Christ,” said Robert Breaud, a traveling preacher in the School of Evangelism.

Dean of Students Matt Brown saw the protest as a good exercise of First Amendment rights. He added that he didn’t know that the group was planning on coming to campus, however, as long as they weren’t disruptive it was OK because it was in accordance with the guidelines of the Free Expression Policy.

The policy allows outside visitors to come to campus, as long as they don’t interfere with the educational environment on campus.

Knapschaefer feels as though the response to the protest was positive, and said she had several people come up to her and said thanks for coming. However, she noted that there was some negativity but feels as though it is not directed towards them.

“Well we figure it’s not us they’re getting mad at. If they have a problem with it, it’s god who they have a problem with,” Knapschaefer said.

Brown agrees with Knapschaefer, saying the protest was a free exchange of ideas and it was important for students to stop and share their opinions.

“When you have a group passionate about their values it can spark some emotion,” Brown said.

The group, Faithful Soldier is currently staying in Ohio, and Knapschaefer said they have been traveling around the country going to different campuses preaching the word of god.

Brown noted that in the 4 years he has been here he has never seen such emotion from students.

Editor’s Note: Veronica Morgan contributed to this article.

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The Independent Student Newspaper of Northern Kentucky University.
Religious group speaks out against masturbation, gays, premartial sex