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The Northerner

‘Sunshine’ a genre-bending affair

Paul Buback

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Focus Features

Imagine if you could erase the memory of an ex-boyfriend or girlfriend. The good times and the bad just simply gone, like the person never existed.

Would you choose to forget the entire relationship?

This is the choice faced by Joel and Clementine in “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.”

Jim Carrey is Joel, a shy, vulnerable man taken by surprise when he discovers that his girlfriend of nearly two years, Clementine (Kate Winslet), has erased him from her memory. Completely.

Unable to cope with the news, Joel undergoes the same procedure to remove Clementine from his mind.

Joel must get rid of everything that reminds him of his former love: gifts, drawings, pictures, and every other possible momento.

With the mind-altering procedure complete, neither Joel nor Clementine have any recollection of each other.

However, a chance encounter on the subway may be just the thing to rekindle a forgotten love.

“Eternal Sunsine” isn’t a drama, a comedy, a romance or a science fiction movie. Rather, it is a perfect mix of all those genres. The result is one of the most fascinating films you’ll ever see.

Charles Kaufman, who wrote “Adaptation” and “Being John Malkovich,” has penned another excellent movie, full of colorful dialogue and interesting plot twists.

Carrey’s performance is a far cry from his “Ace Ventura” days. It would not be a surprise if he wins a few awards for his work in this movie.

The same could be said for Winslet, as the chemistry between the two main characters was perfect.

Elijah Wood and Kirsten Dunst also star in the film and add two interesting subplots that keep the movie fresh throughout.

“Eternal Sunshine” is a must-see movie you won’t want to erase.

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The Independent Student Newspaper of Northern Kentucky University.
‘Sunshine’ a genre-bending affair